No longer is the show field at a Concours d'Elegance flush with Duesenbergs, Packards and European cars with names you can't pronounce. Now there are examples to please just about any automotive palate as evidenced by these extraordinary vehicles on display at yesterday's esteemed Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance in Florida. (photo: Hagerty Classic Cars)


1) 1933 Dymaxion

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  • Name stands for DYnamic MAXimum tensION.
  • Designed by architect and inventor Buckminster Fuller.
  • Fully streamlined, rear-wheel steering, innovative 3-frame chassis, seats 11.
  • Only 1 of 3 remain, this being an authentic recreation by the Lane Motor Museum.
  • Driven 600 miles from the museum in Nashville to Amelia Island for the Concours.
  • Once described by Time Magazine as a "three-wheel, ground-bound zeppelin, with a huge levered A-arm carrying the rear wheel, which swiveled like the tail wheel of an airplane."

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(photos: Hagerty Classic Cars, Mike Matune, Jeff Lane)


2) 1962 Ferrari GTO

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  • Commissioned by Sir Stirling Moss.
  • Driven new from Ferrari factory over 800 miles to Goodwood in England for first race.
  • Unfortunately Moss only drove the car in practice due to injury.
  • Sold for a record-breaking $35 million in 2012.
  • One of the most original GTOs due to its limited time on the track.

(photo: eClassicAutos)

Shown here exiting a pit stop in Carmel, CA.


3) 1948 Chrysler Town & Country Convertible

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  • Originally owned by Leo Carrillo, Hollywood screen star and well-known conservationist.
  • Hood-mounted steer head with eyes that doubled as blinking turn signals, car body painted to match the color of Carrillo's palomino pony, and hand painted 'LC' monograms on the doors and wheel covers.
  • Frequently used in parades. Formerly part of Harrah's Automobile Collection in Reno, then the Imperial Palace Auto Collection in Las Vegas.

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(photo: eClassicAutos)


4) 1954 Mercury XM-800

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  • One-of-a-kind concept car introduced at 1954 Detroit Auto Show. Promotional items such as key chain and toy model were produced, but not the car itself.
  • Intended targets were Buick, Pontiac and Oldsmobile divisions of General Motors.
  • Gifted to University of Michigan Automotive Engineering Lab in late 1950s, then abandoned.
  • Sold after restoration by RM Auctions in 2010 for $429,000.

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  • Featured wraparound windshield, great visibility and first use of forward canted headlights.
  • Innovative aerodynamic wheel openings and functional hood scoop.
  • Fiberglass body and chrome-plated fiberglass trim, including the bumpers.

(photo: eClassicAutos)


5) 1969 Chevrolet Corvette L88

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  • "Rebel" — one of 4 lightweights — was purchased new at a Chevrolet dealership in Tampa.
  • Won 4 of 5 IMSA races in 1971.. and year-end championship titles.
  • Fitted with racing's first set of radial tires, finished first in the GT1 class at Daytona in 1971.
  • Long-time record holder as highest finishing Corvette at Sebring and Daytona.
  • Sold at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale Auction in 2014 for $2.86 million.
  • Raced by Dave Heinz, hence the #57

(photo: Mike Matune)


6) 1928 Stutz Blackhawk Streamliner

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  • Racing legend Frank Lockhart, winner of 1926 Indy 500, drove the Stutz Streamliner in well-documented quest to set land speed record at Daytona Beach in 1928.
  • Car featured a dual Miller straight-eight V16 engine, now on display at Indy Motor Speedway Museum.
  • Recreated by well-known collector Jim Lattin of Encinitas, CA.

(photo: Patrick Cornelissen)

At speeds over 200 mph, Lockhart crashed and died after blowing a tire.